Friday, May 23, 2014

Revolution -- Post-Mortem Examination

Well, that's it, people. Revolution is done and dusted, with not a single satisfactory story resolution in sight.
This week's season and series finale was actually a minor improvement on previous weeks, in that some action did actually happen. The gang foiled the big bad mustard gas attack that had been building up in the past few weeks, except this didn't fix their problems because Ed Truman (possibly one of the worst TV bad guys in the history of TV bad guys, but that's a whole other can of worms) decided to finalize the patriot's plans of killing the president of Texas by shooting the guy and his personal guards himself. So the war with California that Miles and Monroe had been trying to avert looked to be going ahead anyway.
At that point, Monroe did a speech (one of the high points of the show... but then, anything featuring Monroe makes things more interesting) about how everything he'd done had all been for nothing because the war was going to wipe out half the continent anyway. Of course, Miles came up with yet another whacky plan; this time to kidnap the guy pretending to be the president of the USA.
Things got a bit hairy, and Miles told Monroe to take their prisoner and make a run for it. I was hoping for a second that either Miles or Monroe would suggest that Charlie should go with him, but no Charloe was forthcoming, and I think the writers missed another opportunity for those two to go off and be awesome together.
I understand why they did it though, because the next few acts of the show gave Monroe a chance to have the inevitable confrontation with Connor, where Monroe is forced to chose between his son and the trust Miles gifted him with. Monroe decided to go with doing the right thing, but Connor was left feeling betrayed, so Monroe locked him and his traveling buddy, Tom Neville in an old pumping station (or something) to make sure they couldn't interfere with his plans of meeting up with Miles.
We also got a look at the bromance from Miles' side, with Rachel's not-so-subtle opinion that Miles had done the wrong thing in trusting Monroe. Miles had been riding Monroe hard for weeks, so it was interesting to see him letting go a little and choosing to have faith in his old friend, made even better when Monroe actually came through for them. Rachel couldn't have been more shocked, while Charlie seemed relieved, as though she'd wanted to believe Monroe wouldn't screw them, but hadn't been all that sure.
Which brings us around to what little Charloe action there was in this final instalment. Charlie and Monroe had a few moments when they did the whole long-stare-silent-communication thing, but that was it. And finally, after how-many-months, Miles brought up the fact that Charlie had traveled alone with Monroe for all those weeks when she first brought him back to Willoughby.
I think the writers missed an opportunity to bring Charlie and Monroe's relationship, or journey, or whatever it is, full circle to round out the season. Their little association at the beginning of the year was a major storyline, and there's no doubt the things that did and didn't happen between them changed both of them, especially when Monroe busted into the bar to save Charlie from the guys that had drugged her.
"Aw hell, what do you mean the show is cancelled?"
I think an aknowledgement of this, either through a conversation or a significant moment between them was in order to really cement the shifting dynamics. 
Fans are rallying with a petition to get the show picked up by another network. I can see this show fitting in nicely at Syfy or CW, and now that Supernatural is about to finish, and the fact that the spin-off Supernatural: Bloodlines got cancelled before it even started, the CW are going to have a major gap to fill. What better way to do that than with another Eric Kripke powered project, that's already proven some levels of success?
Interestingly enough, whenever I check my blog stats, the posts I've written on Revolution, Monroe, and Charloe continue being the most popular week after week, topping out over Supernatural. This would suggest to me that Revolution is actually more popular than one (especially the TV execs) would assume. Some fans have argued that Revolution's ratings would have been better if NBC hadn't kept messing around with the timeslot. This might be partly true, but I do think Revolution kind of bombed out in the second half of this season with their storylines.
However, one thing that kept me returning to this show was the potential. There were hints of brilliance, plus the cast and characters had their moments. On the off chance that another network does pick up Revolution, then I think they're going to have some serious work in redeeming and proving themselves. If the writers and creators utilize the tools they've already got in the chemestriy between Monroe and Charlie, Miles and Monroe, and Charlie and Miles, and focus thier storylines while thinking even farther out of the box than they've already gone, the maybe Revolution could be the next Supernatural, going down in history as one of the all time great TV shows.
Unfortunately, as of this moment, Revolution is just another cult classic that bites the dust.

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